Album Chart of 1957

<1956 1958>

  • This chart features albums released in 1957 and is limited to all of the albums in my collection which have “A-list” status.
  • Elsewhere, the Albums released in 1957 page shows the full range of albums in this sites' database, including the “B-list” records.
1957-a-little-richard.jpg

THE FIRST ALBUM MASTERPIECE

In the world of the Jukebox Rebel, diminished fifths and compound augmented fourths do not a masterpiece album make. Soul, passion, attitude, character, awesome songs, no filler – that’s what I’m talking about. Woody Guthrie got very close away back in 1940 but, for me, it’s Little Richard who delivers the first masterpiece album – and they’re about as rare as hen’s teeth.

The rock n rollers were now queuing up with long play debuts – in this year we had Chuck Berry, Eddie Cochran and The Crickets with first-time efforts.

Other notable debutants were Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash and Ray Charles.

Elsewhere, the stupendous Ken Nordine is in a world of his own, whilst Ruth Brown, Muddy Waters and Little Walter fly highest in the pure R n B stakes.

The Jukebox Rebel
27-Oct-2015

revised 16-Feb-2016

TJR says:

9.05 “A masterpiece”

”A-wop-bom-a-loo-mop-a-lomp-bom-bom!” He had me after the first 2 seconds of this album really. Spine tinglers make perfect 10s – and Little Richard’s crew give me three of them on this masterpiece. “Here’s Little Richard” was packed full of adrenalin-fuelled primal screamers that were either played hard, fast and wild or hard, slow and sexy. Richard’s rasp and that wildly hammered piano steal the show but, WOW, what a band he had in tow. Richard showed the Rock n Rollers how it should be done – he had two saxophonists, Lee Allen (tenor sax) and Alvin Tyler (baritone sax), playing off each other and whipping it up. On “She’s Got It” there were no less than 4 session men blowing that horn! The rhythm section of Frank Fields (bass) and Earl Palmer (drums) nailed it every time and Edgar Blanchard (guitar) was one of the edgiest pros out of New Orleans. Hands down, the album of the decade.

The Jukebox Rebel
17-Jun-2007


TJR says:

8.48 “Excellent”

Magnificent pieces flow one after the other from this loveable absurdist. He’s a laugh and a half and it’s a real pleasure to spend half an hour journeying through his brilliant mind – the man’s a genius. “Word Jazz” is an absolute must for musical adventurers that love trips out to the leftfield. I wonder if Ivor Cutler bought a copy? Oh, he must have…

The Jukebox Rebel
02-Mar-2012


TJR says:

7.90 “Brilliant”

The second ever LP on Chess was this corker from Chuck Berry. The album pooled from his first five recording sessions for the label, spread between 1955 and 1957. Only “Roly Poly” and “Pickin’” were newly released, the other 10 selections having appeared as single sides already. Best two tracks were the only two recorded in 1957 – “School Days” and “Deep Feeling” which were released together as an awesome 7” single in March. On the groovesome “Deep Feeling” Chuck himself proves that the steel guitar ain’t just for the honky tonk brigade. Backing Chuck on the classic “School Days” were guitarist Hubert Sumlin (who is known for his work with Howlin' Wolf), bassist Willie Dixon, and drummer Fred Below. That irresistible power combo took Chess Records all the way to No. 5 on the Billboard Pop Chart as well as hitting the top of the R n B best sellers. “School Days” was also Chuck Berry's first appearance on the UK Singles Chart reaching #24. He was spreading the gospel worldwide: ”Hail, hail rock and roll / Deliver me from the days of old” Hell yeah!

The Jukebox Rebel
29-Dec-2007


TJR says:

7.41 “Really good”

Released March 1957 (Imperial LP-9038). The previous LPs were current with oldies padding, this one’s oldies with current padding. Which is fine, at least these Imperial albums are always laying out new tracks as far as the album discography is concerned – there was a bit of value for the album fan. Four of the cuts come from his 1949 sessions – they’re all terrific and far from filler, exemplified in the fantastic slow blues burner “Detroit City” which opens up side one. Raunchy album highlight “You Can Pack Your Suitcase” was a side back in 1954 and thoroughly deserves its placement here in the album story. Elsewhere, Fats continues to indulge his passion for a bit of the old pop croon with “I’m In The Mood For Love”, originally performed by Frances Langford in the movie “Every Night at Eight” way back in 1935. What can I say? He’s an improvement on Vera Lynn…

The Jukebox Rebel
26-Jan-2012


TJR says:

7.35 “Really good”

The first Sun Records artist to release an LP and what a debut it was. An instant pop up country star to go. The song-writing is mature already and they’re delivered with an infectious warmth in the vocal. A compelling listen and full of instant career standards like “I Walk The Line”, “Cry Cry Cry” and “Folsom Prison Blues”.

The Jukebox Rebel
02-Jun-2007


TJR says:

7.32 “Really good”

It’s not uncommon for the debut albums of the 1950s to serve as round-ups of preceding single sides, and such is the case for the first Muddy Waters LP. I have used my discretion to afford the release an “A-list” status, although it’s really pushing the boundaries by virtue of the fact that “I Can’t Be Satisified” was recorded way back in April 1948! This is an isolated case however, and the rest of the recording dates are a little more timeous: 1950 (2); 1951 (4); 1952 (1); 1953 (1) and 1954 (3). If it was any other decade I’d be much less inclined to be so lenient, but, hey-ho, it’s the 50s and, after all, these are the first tentative steps into the LP market by Chess. As if the aforementioned wasn’t bad enough, the year of release is the next dilemma! “The Best of Muddy Waters” was released in 1957 according to bsnpubs.com, Discogs and RYM (who have it as the #1 compile LP of that year). There's a fair degree of support for an April 1958 release date due to the fact that the LP was reviewed in Billboard at that time (along with Chuck Berry's “One Dozen Berrys” which was several catalogue numbers later). It's possible that Billboard were simply late with “getting on” or, as is more likely, received a promotion batch non-timeously from the Chess label. I also note that the preceding catalogue number (Chess LP-1427, the debut Chuck Berry) has a confirmed release date of May 1957. You’d have to think LP-1428 wouldn’t be too far behind that. Anyway, all of these technical points aside, the set is very fine indeed, and would have served as a wonderful introduction to Muddy’s sound – relaxed, but full of conviction, sexy bluesy rather than mournful bluesy. Muddy plays the part of an Alpha male with a preacher’s magnetism, comin’ from deep in the Delta, but now firmly framed by an urban, street-wise grime. Muddy leads his charges various well, notably Little Walter who’s a virtual ever-present on his harmonica. A young Mick Jagger was certainly impressed when he got his copy by mail order. The inclusion here of Muddy’s 1950 single, “Rollin’ Stone”, proved to somewhat monumental…

The Jukebox Rebel
15-Feb-2016


TJR says:

7.26 “Really good”

Walter’s “debut album” follows the trend of his peers… serving as a singles round up, it features Chess sides released between 1952 and 1955. I’ve used discretion to afford “A” status to such albums of the period…

The Jukebox Rebel
16-May-2012


TJR says:

7.22 “Really good”

Stellar debut from the Texan quartet led by Buddy Holly, issued in November 1957. At this stage The Crickets were lead guitarist and vocalist Buddy Holly, drummer Jerry Allison, bassist Joe Mauldin, and rhythm guitarist Niki Sullivan. Who can resist Niki Sullivan’s Rock n Roll onslaught on “Oh Boy” or Jerry Allison’s card-box percussion on “Not Fade Away” or Buddy Holly’s vocal acrobatics on “That’ll Be The Day”? 10 tracks were written in house whilst 2 were covers – “It’s Too Late” (Chuck Willis, 1956) and “Send Me Some Lovin’” (Little Richard and his band, 1957).

The Jukebox Rebel
01-Aug-2008


TJR says:

7.19 “Really good”

In all, between 1949 and 1955, Ruth Brown had stayed on the R&B chart for a total 149 weeks, with sixteen Top 10 records including five number ones. The hyperbole was in overdrive: ”In the South Ruth Brown is better known than Coca Cola.” Atlantic Records became known as ”The house that Ruth built”. She was widely acknowledged as ”the queen of R&B”. It took until 1957 however, for her first Pop Hit, the Jerry Leiber / Mike Stoller penned “Lucky Lips”, which reached number 6 on the R&B chart, and number 25 on the US pop chart. This “debut album” was quickly assembled (Atlantic 8004), leading with the hit song and rounding up the big hitting sides from the preceding years. 1954’s “Hello Little Boy” is the clear highlight - a sensational stormer from her own pen… The album stands as a super introduction to the Ruth Brown story thus far.

The Jukebox Rebel
09-Apr-2012


TJR says:

7.09 “Really good”

It’s hard to believe, but the young Patsy Cline had great difficulty in converting her extraordinary vocal talent into hit singles. She had signed to Bill McCall’s Four Star label (which has license affiliation with Decca) in 1955 and her first 4 singles, all in the honky tonk style, had failed to make any impression. Don Hecht, a songwriter for the label, thought that Patsy’s style was ideal for one of his songs that had been rejected by Kay Starr in 1954 – “Walkin’ After Midnight”. Cline initially did not like the song because it was, according to her, “just a little old pop song.” However, the song’s writers and record label insisted that she record it, with the compromise being that she could choose the b-side (“A Poor Man’s Roses (Or a Rich Man’s Gold)”). After performing the song nationally on the CBS TV show “Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts”, the switch boards went crazy, Decca stepped in, and “Walkin’ After Midnight” was rush released as her 5th single on February 11, 1957. The song quickly debuted on the Billboard charts, eventually peaking at No. 2 on the Hot Country Songs chart and No. 12 on the Pop chart by March 3rd. Brilliantly backed by “Nashville’s A-Team”, the song was a stone classic, fusing blues, pop and country with a cool ease. Patsy’s winsome croon and Don Helm’s nagging steel guitar were dynamite together. On the strength of the single, the debut album from the 24 year old duly followed in August, featuring 12 recordings made for Four Star/Decca between January 1956 and May 1957. Top Nashville production was handled by Owen Bradley, with background vocal group The Anita Kerr Singers adding pop doo-doops and lonesome wah-wahs. The band back her brilliantly on the LP, her sweet and pure vocal and easy going style are upfront all the way and, for me, the subtle bluesy inflection was just the perfect pitch for the job in hand. “Hungry For Love”, “Fingerprints”, “(Write Me) In Care Of The Blues” and one of her own compositions, “Don’t Ever Leave Me Again”, are all fantastic examples of this stylistic melting pot. A new star was born…

The Jukebox Rebel
21-Jul-2008


TJR says:

6.78 “Good”

Released August 1957 (Imperial LP-9040). Split down the middle between new material and sides from the previous years. Two covers on the album include “My Happiness” (Marlin Sisters, 1947) and “As Time Goes By” (sung by the character Sam (Dooley Wilson) in the movie Casablanca, 1942). The album lacks the punch of his previous classics, but the opener “The Rooster Song” has commendable charms and the closer “You Know I Miss You” walks down that late night bluesy path where the authentic black music bars are found…

The Jukebox Rebel
26-Jan-2012


TJR says:

6.59 “Good”

Issued in June 1957. His debut album included some new material combined with some select single cuts from his short career to date. The set was originally scheduled as “Swingin' The Blues” (RPM LRP-3005) in either late '56 or early '57, but there was a change of plan and B.B.'s debut LP was instead put out on Crown and retitled.

The Jukebox Rebel
05-Oct-2010


TJR says:

6.43 “Decent enough”

”First I played on tin cans in backyards. Then when I was 11 years old I joined a trio and got a job on 125th playing for 25¢ every third night” said Louis Martinez in 1968. Some people are just born with rhythm and “Sabu”, as he was most commonly known, was one such person. By the age of 18, the New York born percussionist had replaced Chano Pozo in Dizzy Gillespie's orchestra, and a year later began performing with Benny Goodman's Bebop Orchestra. On “Palo Conga” he takes his first opportunity as a band leader with aplomb, serving up an exotic potpourri where African chanting and drumming mix it up with Latin American rhythms to create an interesting and, at times, mesmerizing listening experience. Congas and bongos are to the fore – up to 5 at a time – as well as vocals and chants. Musical accompaniment is generally light and acoustic, giving an authentic, traditional feel. “El Cumbanchero” begins with a vocal introduction by Sabu, asking everyone to listen to the drum which expresses his soul. These hand rhythms are immediately infectious. This impressive start is maintained by “Billumba - Palo Congo” which seems to be some sort of religious ritual, with Arsenio Rodriguez preaching in an Afro-Cuban cult dialect to antiphonal responses by the group. “Asabache” closes side 1 on an African Safari as the congas take over completely. Side 2 opens up by continuing that journey as “Simba” utilizes more of that trance-inducing conga drumming alongside more ritualistic chanting. Best of the lot is “Tribilin Cantore” at the close of play, probably the most Latin of all the pieces here. It’s a gentle pastoral tribute to the scenery, climate, and products of beautiful Cuba, with more guitar by Arsenio and an extremely manic bass solo by Evaristo Baro. Very enjoyable – and a very welcome break up to the hipsters play lists of 1957.

The Jukebox Rebel
12-Oct-2015


TJR says:

6.36 “Decent enough”

Atlantic 8006. Released June, 1957. A fine debut from the inspirational 26 year old who’d been completely blind since 7. For album buyers of the day this was a terrific introduction to the man, rounding up 14 sides 1953 to date. A soulful and bluesy affair, mostly penned by Ray himself including the irrepressible “I’ve Got A Woman” (which he’d all but nicked in 1954 from “It Must Be Jesus” by the Southern Tones), the rip-roaring rocker “Mess Around” and the snappy swinger “Greenbacks”. Includes a couple of cool covers - “Drown In My Own Tears” (Sonny Thompson and Lula Reed, 1952) and “Sinner’s Prayer” (Lowell Fulson, 1950). Right about here, Ray Charles was a dude…

The Jukebox Rebel
25-Jul-2008


TJR says:

5.98 “Average”

Arriving in July were both the second Elvis film and the third Elvis album – “Loving You” was his first soundtrack LP and it gave him his third straight number one on the album charts. The title-track was written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller who would prove to have a big role to play in the Elvis story in the period which immediately followed, although, on the evidence of the track in question, the artist was displaying early signs of middle of the road tendencies. The bounce back to credibility was immediate with the fabulous “Got A Lot Of Livin’ To Do” getting me back onside. Side 1 featured 7 songs which were featured in the movie itself, whilst side 2 added 5 unrelated tracks including two of the best on the album – the bluesy ballads “Blueberry Hill” and “Don’t Leave Me Now”.

The Jukebox Rebel
06-Aug-2008


TJR says:

5.84 “Average”

Perhaps disappointed by the sales of 1954’s “Jacques Brel Et Ses Chansons”, it was fully 3 years later until there was a second album for Brel. Spurred on by the success of the “Quand On N’a Que L’amour” single, a French Top 3 hit in March 1957, Philips were quick to react with an album to back it up, pooling from sessions recorded over a 2 year span between March 1955 and March 1957. Despite the promising “bad-boy James Dean” image portrayed on the front cover, “Quand On N’A Que L’Amour” was generally a tad more genteel than the debut, a situation not helped by the confusing multitude of sessions / conductors involved.

The Jukebox Rebel
03-Jul-2008


TJR says:

5.08 “Below average”

The 4th Elvis album was issued in October 1957 and gave him his 4th consecutive Billboard chart topper. Leiber and Stoller provided “Santa Claus Is Back In Town” and Elvis chose to select it as the album opener. Alas, the great start is not maintained – groan – if only he had commissioned them for a full on bluesy Xmas. “White Christmas” follows as Elvis falls somewhere halfway between Bing Crosby and Clyde McPhatter’s Drifters version, ultimately pleasing neither camp. Songwriter Irving Berlin called for this entire album to be banned from radio airplay, labelling Elvis’ version a “profane parody of a cherished yuletide standard”. What a silly old fool. A version of Doye O’Dell’s “Blue Christmas” toughens up an otherwise drippy side 1. Best on a disappointing Side 2 is “Silent Night” arranged by Elvis himself. The final 4 tracks are gospel songs which had been previously released on the EP “Peace in the Valley” back in March. Not great, but well worth some cherry picking.

The Jukebox Rebel
11-Aug-2008


TJR says:

4.86 “Poor”

Mambo mania! Or not, as the case may be. Machito’s gang deliver a brassy brand of Latin Orchestra dance where big band sensibilities blend with African rhythms. It’s an album of originals; “Tin Tin Deo” – originally done by James Moody and His Bop Men featuring Chano Pozo back in 1948 – is the only cover on-board. Guest musicians include Doc Cheatham and Joe Newman on trumpet, Cannonball Adderley on alto sax, and Eddie Bert on trombone. Band regular and arranger band Ray Santos moonlights on tenor sax. A seven-man percussion section (including Candido Camero and Carlos “Patato” Valdes) rounds it out. Occasionally stimulating but rarely gripping – I guess Afro-Cuban Jazz is just not my thing.

The Jukebox Rebel
13-Oct-2015


TJR says:

4.68 “Poor”

“The Morse Code” came entirely from Ella Mae’s final recording sessions in June 1957. Producer Lee Gillette allowed her to choose the repertoire and to collaborate on arrangements with Billy May. Somewhat predictably, she delves into the American songbook to croon away in regular fashion to a light pop-jazz musical accompaniment. I give pass marks for her version of Johnny Mercer’s chart-topper from 1945, “Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate The Positive”, an undoubted farewell tribute to her mentor from back in the day. “My Funny Valentine” is another pleaser – it’s really quite snazzy and a total re-interpretation. “Dream A Little Dream Of Me” is just a great song – and Ella does a fine job with it. Think I’ve latched on to the affirmative…

The Jukebox Rebel
26-Aug-2011


TJR says:

3.83 “Terrible”

Nothing doing on the third Jim Reeves album – he’s become as ovaltiney as Pat Boone.

The Jukebox Rebel
07-Aug-2008


TJR says:

3.30 “Terrible”

Off-kilter prog-jazz from the revered pianist which does nothing for me. According to Down Beat magazine, Brilliant Corners was the most critically acclaimed album of 1957. Nat Hentoff, the magazine's editor, gave it five stars in a contemporary review and called it ”Riverside's most important modern jazz LP to date.” Jazz writer David H. Rosenthal later called it a ”classic” hard bop session. Music critic Robert Christgau said that, along with his 1959 live album “Misterioso”, “Brilliant Corners” represents Monk's artistic peak. In his five-star review of the album, Allmusic's Lindsay Planer wrote that it ”may well be considered the alpha and omega of post-World War II American jazz. No serious jazz collection should be without it.”

The Jukebox Rebel
12-Oct-2015


TJR says:

3.03 “Terrible”

The New World Orchestra were one of the fabricated “in-house” monikers used by Trans-World, a part of Miller International Company of Media, Pennsylvania, which was run by David L. Miller. The label started in 1956 and lasted to about 1958. As well played as it undoubtedly is, this is about as interesting as hotel elevator music, although the cheezeball liner notes do their best to separate you from your pound: “The New World Theatre Orchestra presents this sparkling programme of hits from the period when the dance trend was in its golden age. The 1930s and 1940s. Two decades of great songs played by bands that laid in the beat. These are songs that somehow seem to have been constructed for a dance feel. These arrangements are pure dance arrangements. They leave nothing to be denied in tempo or melodic content. Put down your coke or cocktail - let’s get up and dance - to hits of the thirties and forties.

The Jukebox Rebel
20-Jun-2007

chart first published 27 Oct 2015; last edited 16 Feb 2016

Album Charts

by year…

1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

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