Album Chart of 1959

<1958 1960>

  • This chart features albums released in 1959 and is limited to all of the albums in my collection which have “A-list” status.
  • The Top 30 albums are profiled, and the full chart (Top 32) is summarised, in sortable table form, on the Albums released in 1959 page, which shows the full range of albums in this sites' database, including the “B-list” records.
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IVOR CUTLER - THE EIGHTH WONDER OF THE WORLD

Art Rupe squeezes out another Little Richard album set from the Specialty vaults – it’s effortlessly album of the year. I can’t help but wonder though – what would the King of Rock n Roll have delivered had he not prematurely abdicated his throne in 1957? The Howlin’ Wolf, a visceral force of nature, finally gets his name on an album as Chess slowly and surely continue to expand their long-play catalogue.

Sandwiched between these Top 2 heavyweights and Chuck Berry (no.4) is Ivor Cutler. The 36-year-old made his recording debut with a 7 song extended play which laid down as unique a marker as any mini or full length set has ever done, before or since. Goodness and oddness shines from the creative maverick from the word go – to get to know Ivor is to love him. He’s given me years of pleasure with his intellectual immaturity – and he stands as a great reminder that being grown up is over rated. The least I can do is give him a headline even if he’s only nearly number one. He would have preferred it that way I’m sure. In fact, he’d probably have preferred it if he was number 27, a much more interesting number as I’m sure we’d all agree.

Ivor Cutler, Y’Huponian, Harmonium Mock-Rock God, I salute you Sir.

The Jukebox Rebel
30-Oct-2015

revised 16-Feb-2016

TJR says:

8.42 “Excellent”

“The Fabulous Little Richard” arrived in March – a full year and a half after the unpredictable star had retired from Rock n Roll, citing religious grounds. The recordings stem from sessions 1955-57 and predominantly feature the old gang: Little Richard (vocals, piano); Lee Allen (tenor sax); Alvin Tyler (baritone sax); Frank Fields (bass); Earl Palmer (drums) and Edgar Blanchard (guitar). Head of A&R at Specialty was Sonny Bono and he came up with the idea of adding female backing singers, the Stewart Sisters (Darlene Paul, Trudy Hancock and Irene Diaz), to many of these tracks. The trio were releasing their own singles at the time, and it probably seemed like a win-win situation for the Specialty camp. The idea was passed off on the liner notes as being Little Richard’s request to add a “gospel” feel to the songs – almost certainly baloney. Many were horrified. Ideally, they would have been a bit more soulful, but they certainly don’t do any harm – they add a pop-ish, Shirelles-y feel to proceedings, and give Richard’s third LP a unique identity. Their presence is evident from the word go on “Shake a Hand”, which could hardly be any more perfect. Generally speaking, the set is far bluesier than the preceding two albums – “She Knows How To Rock” and “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Going On” are the only two rockers on-board. For the third album in-a-row, excellence abounds whether blues, rhythm n blues or rock n roll. In the Little Richard story, the “Specialty Part 1” chapter was simply unbeatable.

The Jukebox Rebel
18-Apr-2008


TJR says:

8.21 “Excellent”

Twelve single sides (issued 1951-1959) are gathered to make up the powerful Howlin’ Wolf long-play debut. “Moanin’ At Midnight” and “How Many More Years” date way back to his rough and ready first Memphis session for Sam Philips in July 1951 but apart from these, the recording dates all stem from the preceding 5 or 6 years in Chicago, with a couple from 1958. All in all, I’m quite comfortable with the “A-list” labelling, in the discretionary spirit of the decade which has also seen similar cases from Fats Domino, Muddy Waters, Little Walter and Bo Diddley, to name but 4. “How Many More Years” is simply a primeval beast; surely one of the punkiest sounds ever heard by 1951? Equally thrilling, albeit considerably more polished and refined, is “Smoke Stack Lightning”, which shows great sensitivity on the vocal from the Wolf; the cat sure can howl. Side 2 opens with “Evil Is Goin’ On”, the gritty Willie Dixon song being the only one on the LP not to come from the pen of the Wolf. “Forty Four” is the album’s fourth bona-fide classic; although rooted in an old blues standard, the Wolf takes his own writing credit such is his transformation. It’s tough, gruff and menacing – just the way I like it. It sums the album up really; our lead man is naturally blessed with a visceral magnetism, the likes of which is as rare as the most precious of diamonds.

The Jukebox Rebel
08-Feb-2016


TJR says:

7.66 “Brilliant”

Cracking debut EP from the 36 year old Glaswegian humourist, immediately revelling in his own brand of absurd surrealism, with even the “Y’Hup” of the title being a fictional, isolated island of Cutler’s own imagination. Says Ivor: ”I didn’t settle down to really composing until I was 34. I was a school teacher, I had a wife and a couple of kids. I wanted to be a painter and I thought I wouldn’t be able to leave teaching because I needed the money. So I thought, “I’ll compose a song and somebody else can sing it and I’ll just cash in on it, and then I’ll be able leave teaching”. Pathetic, isn’t it? For about three years I wrote songs and went around to Tin Pan Alley and gave about three songs to each person with a stamped addressed envelope. They’d send them back in a couple of weeks so they wouldn’t hurt my feelings. Eventually, in 1957, I said the seven words that changed my life: Perhaps I ought to sing them myself.” < Preposterous tales in the life of Ivor Cutler! However he came to be, there’s a sizeable cult following that are truly grateful that he did – to admit that you’re over your child-like sense of wonder is to admit that you’re near the end. And who wants that? The EP consists of 7 songs – all sung by Ivor and all featuring him on the harmonium – a set-up which would become his familiar trademark in the years to come. “Size 9½” is an instant classic: ”Do you remember when you were young and your feet were narrow and splayed, Do you remember when you were young you used to play with your feet all day, Size nine and a half or ten metres in French, Size nine and a half or ten metres in French”. My inner lunatic just finds that verse and chorus irresistible. Ivor took his works to the BBC who, in Cutler’s words, ”found them to their taste”. Cutler was invited to read his idiosyncratic poems and stories on the forerunner of Radio 4, the old Home Service. As with this EP, he performed to the accompaniment of a pedal-driven harmonium which could only play, as far as listeners could tell, in a depressive minor key. In all, he broadcast thirty-eight stories on the BBC’s “Monday Night At Home” between 1959 and 1963. An unlikely new star was born…

The Jukebox Rebel
03-May-2007


TJR says:

7.53 “Brilliant”

Surely a vital album for any self-respecting music fan in the 1950s, this was the quintessential Chuck Berry, all fired up and ready to Rock n Roll. The album pools from single A and B sides 1956 to 1959, carefully omitting any tracks which appeared on the first two LPs. A winning package all the way…

The Jukebox Rebel
17-Feb-2008


TJR says:

7.23 “Really good”

In early 1959 Brel renewed his contract with Philips, and the fourth album was soon to follow. “N°4” was all recorded in September 1959, and entirely orchestrated by François Rauber, resulting in a cohesive and passionate set, where Brel delivers his most stirring and theatrical performance to date, culminating in the utterly magnificent “La Valse À Mille Temps”. Try waltzing to THAT Grandma!

The Jukebox Rebel
04-Jul-2008


TJR says:

7.21 “Really good”

At the time of his death Big Bopper had quite a lot “in the can”, as demonstrated here on his one and only LP, issued by Mercury in March 1959 - just a matter of weeks after he had tragically died, aged just 28, in a plane crash. The title-track had been released back in July 1958 and “Big Bopper’s Wedding / Little Red Riding Hood” had been a single in November 1958. Apart from these, there were nine tracks newly revealed, including the classic “White Lightning”. The sad background to the album’s release is completely at odds with the feel-good factor within, for the Bopper was surely the top dog in “character” Rock n Roll, and there was no place for moping in his world. Who can resist smiling at ”Makes me feel real loose, like a long-necked goose” or ”And there’s your Daddy sittin’ over there with a big shotgun over his lap, and a big ugly smile on his face, and the man keeps sayin’: “Are You Gonna Take This Woman Or Aint Ya”?” or ”Well I asked my pappy why call it brew, White lightning, ’stead of mountain dew. I took on sip and then I knew, As my eyes bugged out and my face turned blue. Mighty, mighty pleasin’, my pappy’s corn squeezin’, White Lightning”. The big man was a one-off. And this album stands as his great send-off…

The Jukebox Rebel
01-Dec-2011


TJR says:

6.73 “Good”

The prolific John Lee Hooker entered the frame as an album artist in 1959 with two releases. First in his “A-list” was a compilation, “I’m John Lee Hooker”, rounding up Vee-Jay single sides issued between 1955 and 1959, all of which were recorded in that period too. His soulful brand of electric blues is full of character and easy to love – consistently good and occasionally excellent. This VeeJay version of “Boogie Chillun”, his oft-recorded standard which dates back to 1948, is labelled by many as the definitive recording (although it could never beat the retitled “Walkin’ The Boogie” 1952 rendition in my book). On the albums’ other main highlight, Hooker revisits “Crawlin’ King Snake” which would later inspire The Doors to include the song on their “LA Woman” LP in 1970. They had good taste…

The Jukebox Rebel
15-Jun-2012


TJR says:

6.71 “Good”

A more than decent set of American folk ballads notable for “The Caretaker”, “I Want To Go Home” (aka Sloop John B to you and me!) and “Grandfather Clock” (was Nigel Blackwell here for “Joy Division Oven Gloves”?)

The Jukebox Rebel
23-Mar-2007


TJR says:

6.63 “Good”

Brown had secured an early prison release on June 14, 1952 after serving three years of his sentence for armed robbery. The authorities agreed to release him on the condition that he would “get a job”. After stints as a boxer and baseball pitcher in semi-professional baseball (a career move ended by a leg injury), Brown turned his energy positively toward music. After a few years of gospel that ”didn’t pay no rent”, Federal Records president Ralph Bass signed the Famous Flames to his label in February 1956 and had them record “Please Please Me” in Cincinnati’s King Studios. Released the following month, the song became the Famous Flames’ first R&B hit, selling over a million copies. Strangely, and somewhat unjustly, a string of chart misses followed, then, in late 1958, Brown self-financed the demo of his ballad, “Try Me”. Released that October, it returned the Famous Flames to the charts and reached No. 1 on the R&B chart in February 1959, becoming the first of 17 chart-topping hits on that chart to be credited to Brown over the next 15 years. This debut album rounds up 10 of the 16 sides released on Federal between 1956 and 1958, and it’s an exercise in cool all the way. A must have…

The Jukebox Rebel
18-Apr-2012


TJR says:

6.38 “Decent enough”

Arriving at the very tail end of ’59 was “The Fabulous Wailers”, quite possibly the first artists’ album to grunge things up a bit. They were all their own songs too – respect is due. The five-piece, from Tacoma, Washington, were still high school buddies when they recorded this, making their achievement all the more remarkable. They were: John Greek (rhythm guitar, trumpet); Richard Dangel (lead guitar); Kent Morrill (piano, vocals); Mark Marush (tenor sax) and Mike Burk (drums). Following a tip-off, Golden Crest’s Clark Galehouse visited Seattle early in 1959 to watch the band play live, and a couple of local recording sessions followed. From these sessions, “Tall Cool One” and “Mau Mau” both cracked the Billboard 100. The group even appeared on Dick Clark’s nationally networked “American Bandstand”. With Golden Crest being New York based, the onus was on the band to make the coast to coast trip to record, which they duly did in the summer of 1959. It was the three day sessions provided the bulk of the LP which was finally released in December. Johnny Greek was the only band member who was prepared to relocate to New York to further the band’s prospects, but without the support of his buddies it was a non-starter and Golden Crest’s interest cooled. Still, they made their opening statement – it was mission accomplished on that score. Best on the album is “Dirty Robber” – the only track with vocals! The lyrics were written and sung, nay drawled, by Kent Morrill, and sonically the performance stands as the sound of the early Wailers, digging on Little Richard with a whole lot of attitude rock. ”Well they take-a-yo money, and then they take-a-yo car, Little girl she even took my guitar!!! well now she’s a dirty robber, they’re all dirty robbers” Roses in the moonlight and sweet shooby-doo-wops were not for these bad boys…

The Jukebox Rebel
03-Mar-2012


TJR says:

6.31 “Decent enough”

Released September 1959 (Imperial LP-9065). All new material on this one, with 9 originals and 3 covers. The album gets off to a nice sultry start with “You Left Me”, a jazzy, smoky Fats. “Ain’t It Good” is next, back on the pop blues tip, comes complete with the line “It ain’t what you eat it’s the way that you chew it”… STEADY… The three covers include “Margie” (The Original Dixieland Jazz Band, 1920), “Hands Across The Table” (Lucienne Boyer in the Show “Continental Varieties”, 1934) and “When The Saints Go Marching In” (Paramount Jubilee Singers, 1923). Fats is always at his best for me when he slows it down and burns up the blues – “I Want To Walk You Home” is the cut which dominates proceedings on this set. Overall, his weakest set to date – but a decent album all the same…

The Jukebox Rebel
26-Jan-2012


TJR says:

6.30 “Decent enough”

Ever the journeyman, John Lee stepped aside from his commitment to VeeJay with this set for Riverside Records, recorded 20th April 1959 in Detroit. Spiritually, the Mississippi boy was back home for this one. It’s a rootsy affair and straddles many traditional forms – from the hill country blues of Fred McDowell to the deep Delta blues of Charley Patton. It’s not always dynamic, but there are some great moments. His tender moanin’ on “Tupelo” is supreme. He’s chronicling the flood of 20 years earlier: ”People never forgot it. So when I grew up and got famous, I wrote about it and it brought back memories to a lot of people” He’s always intimate, but it was surely never more apparent than right here. John Lee is the real deal. As Downbeat said in their review at the time: “it is delightful to be able to hear a full-voiced blues singer, backing himself on country-style guitar….There's heartache, sadness, joy, and hope in these songs…”

The Jukebox Rebel
15-Jun-2012


TJR says:

6.04 “Decent enough”

The irreverent Californians return for a second album for Challenge (CHL-605) and continue much where they left off on last years “Go Champs Go”. No “Tequila” slammers on this one, but the sleazy “Subway” is a mega-cool sax-led stroller, “Mau Mau Stomp” is a swinger for the party hipsters and “The Toast” puts a smile on the face with its’ momentary interlude exclamations including “Here’s Lookin At Ya”, “Bottoms Up” and “Skol”. Rock on Champs…

The Jukebox Rebel
28-Mar-2007


TJR says:

6.03 “Decent enough”

The second Sam Cooke album of 1959 rounds up 11 single sides from 1957-1959, with a reworked version of “Lonely Island” representing the only previously unreleased offering. Repeats “You Send Me” from the 1958 debut LP, but apart from that all tracks were new to his album discography thus far. Of all his solo albums to date, this is the one which is most firmly stamped with his own personality - it’s no coincidence that an unprecedented 6 of the 12 tracks are originals. “Win Your Love (For Me)” at last shows some signs of the great potential that had previously been shown when he was a singer with The Soul Stirrers. It was penned by his brother, L.C., and seems to find a great new sound – soulful pop with an R n B groove. You’re onto something here Sammy boy…

The Jukebox Rebel
28-Jul-2008


TJR says:

5.57 “Average”

Interesting set from the innovative cool-jazz pianist and his band, beloved of the ad agencies for their brand of sophisticated but accessible instrumental offerings. The opening salvo veers from the terrific, happening weird beat of “Blue Rondo A La Turk” to the awful, pseudo-classical light-jazz of “Strange Meadow Lark” and that hit-or-miss vibe kinda sums the album up for me. “Take Five” is the best of the lot (one of those ‘ah, this is who does that tune’ moments for me) with a nagging riff that swirls around your head long after it’s gone. It was alto saxophonist Paul Desmond who came up with that one – the only tune not to be credited to the group leader. I quite like how this guy was pushing for new feels in his music – his record company was very unsure about releasing an album with so many unorthodox time signatures but they needn’t have worried; the college campus hipsters lapped it up and it quickly went platinum. For what it’s worth, it was the first jazz album to sell more than a million copies.

The Jukebox Rebel
09-Oct-2015


TJR says:

5.50 “Average”

Released in January, and the first of 3 new Johnny Cash albums in 1959. All tracks were recorded for Sun Records between July 1955 and July 1958, but cleverly compiled without replication to the overall Cash LP discography thus far. 3 Hank Williams covers are on-board to keep that country dollar strong. That Sam Phillips feller wasn’t daft…

The Jukebox Rebel
04-Jun-2007


TJR says:

5.28 “Below average”

Atlantic 1312. Released October, 1959. All new, although 1 track is reworked from the back-album catalogue – “Deed I Do” (from the “Soul Brothers” LP, 1958). ”Hey y’all tell everybody, Ray Charles in town, Got a dollar and a quarter and I’m just rarin’ ta clown, Don’t let no body, play me cheap, I got fifty cents more than I’m gonna keep.” So proclaims the “genius” on opening salvo “Let The Good Times Roll” (Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five, 1946). What a cheap tart. It’s a truly classic starter though… I could even be seduced by the genius hype if he were to keep up that level of excitement. Unfortunately however, we get an all acoustic big band covers set that’s intent on culling from the American songbook all the way. The album won the 1960 Grammy Award in the Pop category for “Best Vocal Performance – Album” as well as the 1960 Grammy for “Best Rhythm & Blues Performance” on “Let The Good Times Roll.” Personally speaking, it’s a middle-class revolt that I’m after. And this sounds like a bit of a surrender to me…

The Jukebox Rebel
25-Jul-2008


TJR says:

5.07 “Below average”

The swellegant doo woppers from Chicago had a noticeable change of direction when they started recording for George Goldner’s End Records in 1958. More and more the song selections would dip into the old Broadway standards of the 1930s and 1940s, a move which was well rewarded via pop chart success. This was not an undertaking that gelled well with my sensibilities, although the undoubted class shone through on “Music, Maestro, Please!” and “I Only Have Eyes For You”. The latter, written in 1934 by composer Harry Warren and lyricist Al Dubin for the film “Dames”, became their biggest seller, and has been featured in dozens of movies and TV shows. Overall stamp? Beware of the manufactured pop process…

The Jukebox Rebel
05-Dec-2008


TJR says:

5.00 “Below average”

Recorded live at The Town Hall New York City on September 15, 1959 with the exception of “Cotton Eye Joe”, which had to be re-done in the studio a month later. Accompanying Nina on piano and vocals are bassist Jimmy Bond and drummer Albert ‘Tootie’ Heath. Starting things off, Nina delivers a sombre version of an old folk ballad, “Black Is The Color Of My True Loves Hair” and certainly grabs attention with her moody chops. Her version of “Exactly Like You” (Roger Wolfe Kahn and His Orchestra, 1930) lifts the mood immediately, following a remarkably similar pattern to “My Baby Just Cares For Me”. Side 2 has instrumental and vocal versions of “Summertime” (one extended performance in reality) as well as a reading of the old traditional “Cotton Eyed Joe”. These are the modest highlights on an offering with meagre bounty.

The Jukebox Rebel
23-Aug-2009


TJR says:

4.95 “Poor”

Cash’s second LP for Columbia, released in March 1959. He had left Sun Records because Sam Phillips wouldn’t let him record the gospel songs he’d grown up with. Columbia promised him that he could release an occasional gospel album - and Johnny wasted no time in holding them to their word. Although a popular release, a set of traditional hymns sedately set to country is not generally my idea of fun, even if the big man’s baritone saves the day here and there. Taken as a whole though, Cash’s initial cool vibe is disappearing fast. They branded this is a “gospel” album - what a hoodwink that was…

The Jukebox Rebel
05-Jun-2007


TJR says:

4.88 “Poor”

The Canadian’s brand of country pop is not too shabby – and occasionally strikes a really positive chord with Rebel sensibilities. I do love a good old tragedy – and there are eleven of them here on this conceptual affair. As Bruce Eder (All Music) notes: All of life’s devastating blows are here, including abandonment (“Nobody’s Child”), the death of children (“Put My Little Shoes Away”; “Don’t Make Me Go to Bed and I’ll Be Good”), and the death of a pet (“Old Shep”; “Little Buddy”). Best of the lot is his version of an old tear-jerker written and recorded by Hattie Nevada away back in 1897. In “The Letter Edged In Black” a boy’s life is shattered forever: “I bowed my head in sorrow and in sadness, The sunshine of my life, it all had fled, When the post man brought that letter yesterday morning, Saying ‘come home my boy, your dear old mother's dead.’” It’s a great portrayal from Hank – clearly capable of hitting heavy.

The Jukebox Rebel
03-Mar-2010


TJR says:

4.87 “Poor”

Highly-acclaimed album from Ira and Charlie, who decided upon a country-gospel theme for this one. Check that cover! Designed by Ira, the cover features the brothers standing in a rock quarry in front of a 12-foot-tall plywood rendition of the Devil. Behind Satan are several hidden tyres soaked in kerosene symbolising fire and brimstone. Nutters. Lunacy aside, whilst one or two of these numbers are musically appealing the set is pretty dull on the whole. 5 Stars abound the world over though, so it must have something going for it. Interestingly, critic Scott Walden compared the Louvins' music to the Velvet Underground: “Their comprehension of the tortured throes of a drunkard's Satan-infested soul are no less profound than Lou Reed's own understanding of a heroin junkie wrestling with a world devoid of meaning beyond the piercing tip of the needle… The depth is there in Satan is Real. This album transcends the immediate kitsch appeal of its cover. There is a reason why songs from this album have been performed by the more commonly accepted genius of artists such as Gram Parsons, Johnny Cash, and Emmylou Harris.” Satan is real? Yeah, and Sister Ray’s a Nun.

The Jukebox Rebel
11-Oct-2015


TJR says:

4.53 “Poor”

Jeezo, even Jim Reeves was banging on about Satan in 1959. What the hell was happening back then? Right c’mon everybody, pitchforks out, let’s go chase Link Wray. On “Satan Can’t Hold Me” Jim croons ”Through the valleys darkness I’ll come to your side, your love my beacon, my love my guide” Aw. “Songs To Warm The Heart” was recorded in December 1958 / January 1959 and produced by Chet Atkins who also plays guitar. Occasionally, it even does what it says on the tin, as long as you don’t mind the odd sermon. Every now and then, Jim-bob pops up with a wee cracker that makes me think of my Nan and makes me feel all warm inside. “How’s The World Treating You” does the job on here; Jim’s baritone is impossibly smooth and Floyd Cramer’s honky-tonk Joanna accompanies perfectly. He’s slowed right down these days, and this will prove to be his style ‘til the end. It suits him.

The Jukebox Rebel
17-Aug-2008


TJR says:

4.48 “Lame”

A move up the coast, from Atlantic City to New York, and a change of label culminated in “The Amazing Nina Simone”, the first of many records that the artist would release on Colpix, a division of Columbia Pictures. As part of the deal, Nina was in full creative control of her works, including the choice of material that would be recorded. And she certainly had an eclectic outlook: ”Critics started to talk about what sort of music I was playing” she wrote in her 1991 autobiography, ”and tried to find a neat slot to file it away in. It was difficult for them because I was playing popular songs in a classical style with a classical piano technique influenced by cocktail jazz. On top of that I included spirituals and children’s song in my performances, and those sorts of songs were automatically identified with the folk movement. So, saying what sort of music I played gave the critics problems because there was something from everything in there, but it also meant I was appreciated across the board – by jazz, folk, pop and blues fans as well as admirers of classical music.” I concur with her view – years before I read that, I had noted 8 different main genres over the course of these 12 tracks. Despite the eclecticism and her outstanding talent, her second album still leaves me bored more often than not. The set is dominated by two pieces – the rousing, cerebral pop of “Chilly Winds Don’t Blow” and the uplifting gospel traditional “Children Go Where I Send You”. There’s always something worthwhile on a Nina Simone album…

The Jukebox Rebel
21-Aug-2009


TJR says:

4.43 “Lame”

Sam’s third album for Keen Records, issued in April 1959. The concept looks good on paper; one soulful African American pays tribute to another. The reality says differently; sophisticated jazz ballad tedium for middle of the road bores. Count me out…

The Jukebox Rebel
28-Jul-2008


TJR says:

3.98 “Terrible”

Recorded in a single day, “Gunfighter Ballads” was a homage to the Wild West, smoothly sung with a pop-leaning croon. A big ‘un in country circles, and best known for housing “El Paso”, a huge Grammy Award winning #1 hit on both the country and pop music charts.

The Jukebox Rebel
14-Oct-2015


TJR says:

3.97 “Terrible”

A hugely ambitious 5 disc project from the 41 year old jazz singer, arranged and directed by Nelson Riddle. Even by the weighty standards of her ongoing songbook series, the latest edition was a mighty effort. Ella was 20 years old at the time of George Gershwin’s death in 1937, but Ira Gershwin was still alive to see this project completed. Some of these selections had never been recorded before and he helped to contribute lyrics and support to complete them. Speaking of the end results, the songwriter would later comment: ”I had never known how good our songs were until I heard Ella sing them”.

The Jukebox Rebel
11-Oct-2015


TJR says:

3.87 “Terrible”

The impressive multi-linguist tackles original Spanish lyrics as well as English translations in this Latin flavoured set.

The Jukebox Rebel
24-Aug-2015


TJR says:

3.78 “Terrible”

An enormously influential set from the trumpeter, bandleader and composer. Miles Davis is widely considered one of the most influential and innovative musicians of the 20th century; together with his musical groups he was at the forefront of several major developments in jazz music, including bebop, cool jazz, hard bop, modal jazz, and jazz fusion. On “Kind of Blue” Miles and his ensemble were testing the waters – could they take their hard bop fans with them on the journey to modality? The answer was a resounding yes; according to the RIAA, “Kind of Blue” is the best-selling jazz album of all time, having been certified as quadruple platinum (4 million copies sold).

The Jukebox Rebel
09-Oct-2015


TJR says:

3.55 “Terrible”

A bit of a nightmare for atheist punkers it has to be said.

The Jukebox Rebel
12-Aug-2008

chart first published 30 Oct 2015; last edited 16 Feb 2016

Album Charts

by year…

1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

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