“Two Sevens Clash” by Culture - album review

TJR says

Having auditioned successfully for the “Mighty Two” (producer Joe Gibbs and engineer Errol Thompson) in 1976, the (soon to be legendary) vocal trio wasted no time in finding their own hit formula. Strong songs, catchy and conscious, with call from Joseph Hill, response from Albert Walker and Roy Dayes, and roots-rocking from a first class, state-of-the-art production team. “I’m Not Ashamed” had that “ice-rink organ” sound down to a tee 3 years before The Specials came up with “Do Nothing”. Culture recorded a series of powerful singles, starting with “See Dem a Come” and the hugely successful “Two Sevens Clash”, which predicted the apocalypse on 7th day of the 7th month of 1977. The song, released on the island in as a single in November 1976 (and re-recorded for the album), was sufficiently powerful that many in Kingston stayed indoors on the day in question, fearing that the prophecy would come true, thankfully it did not. Well played Superman. “Pirate Days” stands as the album’s highlight – it’s an early statement of intent from Joseph Hill’s pen – he’ll be running a tight, no nonsense ship as he tells his stories. This time we’re being educated about the destruction of the Arawak Indians by the Pirates as Joe rams home the message with his chant “the Arawaks, the Arawaks, the Arawaks was here first”. There can be no arguing with that.

Side two continues with an equally great sense of purpose, and the strength-in-depth of this band’s material begins to sink in. Back to back, “Get Ready To Ride The Lion Of Zion” and “Black Star Liner” (on the wicked ’Far East’ bass line) are 2 fine songs of repatriation – a constant theme in the group’s songs over the years. “See Them A Come” continues the social commentary with its tale of police brutality mixed in with extracts from history featuring Marcus Garvey. The album finishes with the feel good “Natty Dread Taking Over”, a soulful chanter with some lazy but catchy trombone and a heavy manners bassline that Prince Far I would kill for. It’s a stellar finale to a classy debut…

The Jukebox Rebel
22-Aug-2009


A1 [02:30] 6.9.png Culture - Calling Rastafari (Joseph Hill, Albert Walker, Roy Dayes) Reggae
A2 [03:25] 7.3.png Culture - I’m Alone In The Wilderness (Joseph Hill, Albert Walker, Roy Dayes) Reggae
A3 [02:52] 8.4.png Culture - Pirate Days (Joseph Hill, Albert Walker, Roy Dayes) Reggae
A4 [03:30] 7.4.png Culture - Two Sevens Clash (Joseph Hill, Albert Walker, Roy Dayes) Reggae
A5 [03:59] 7.2.png Culture - I’m Not Ashamed (Joseph Hill, Albert Walker, Roy Dayes) Reggae
B1 [03:27] 7.8.png Culture - Get Ready To Ride The Lion To Zion (Joseph Hill, Albert Walker, Roy Dayes) Reggae
B2 [02:42] 8.3.png Culture - Black Starliner Must Come (Joseph Hill, Albert Walker, Roy Dayes) Reggae
B3 [03:39] 6.8.png Culture - Jah Pretty Face (Joseph Hill, Albert Walker, Roy Dayes) Reggae
B4 [03:24] 7.0.png Culture - See Them A Come (Joseph Hill, Albert Walker, Roy Dayes) Reggae
B5 [03:46] 7.7.png Culture - Natty Dread Taking Over (Joseph Hill, Albert Walker, Roy Dayes) Reggae




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