“Handsworth Revolution” by Steel Pulse - album review

TJR says

Three years of hard work had led the Birmingham group to Island Records, who were seemingly hellbent on becoming a world force in reggae at this time. Nice arrangement for both parties I'd wager. First fruit of the new alliance was the “Ku Klux Klan” single released in February '78, setting our their stall as serious players with a message to deliver. When played live, Alphonso and Mykaell would don the hoods while singing harmonies, reflecting the menace posed by the evil sect. Got to admire that bravery. The seven-piece lined-up: David Hinds (vocals), Alphonso Martin (vocals, percussion), Mykaell Riley (vocals, percussion), Basil Gabbidon (vocals, lead guitar), Ronald McQueen (bass, percussion), Selwyn Brown (keyboards, vocals, percussion) and Steve Nisbett (drums). The album was released in the summer of '78, just as they embarked on a 12-date European tour supporting Bob Marley & The Wailers. Their stock would rise considerably as a result, as group leader David Hinds later explained: “We learned a lot of discipline on that tour that rubbed off - rehearsal, execution on stage, how to tour, stability… that's when the doors really started to open for us. It has always been one of the most memorable moments of my career. To play as part of that package exposed Steel Pulse to audiences that literally were in awe of our message. Of course, being formally introduced through Bob Marley helped us tremendously. Playing for audiences, especially those in Paris who saw the force of Steel Pulse and the force of Bob Marley play on the same bill, enabled us to sell out shows every time since then.” Roots reggae was no longer confined to Jamaica and this can only be seen as a positive. That said, I don't quite embrace the Steel Pulse phenomenon as others do; they're solid and pucker for sure, but for some reason fail to truly catch a fire in my soul.

The Jukebox Rebel
10-Aug-2016

A1 [05:23] 6.1.png Steel Pulse - Handsworth Revolution (David Hinds, Basil Gabbidon, Selwyn Brown, Ronald McQueen, Michael Riley, Steve Nisbett, Alphonso Martin) Reggae
A2 [05:39] 5.5.png Steel Pulse - Bad Man (David Hinds, Basil Gabbidon, Selwyn Brown, Ronald McQueen, Michael Riley, Steve Nisbett, Alphonso Martin) Reggae
A3 [04:40] 6.3.png Steel Pulse - Soldiers (David Hinds, Basil Gabbidon, Selwyn Brown, Ronald McQueen, Michael Riley, Steve Nisbett, Alphonso Martin) Reggae
A4 [03:30] 6.6.png Steel Pulse - Sound Check (David Hinds, Basil Gabbidon, Selwyn Brown, Ronald McQueen, Michael Riley, Steve Nisbett, Alphonso Martin) Reggae
B1 [05:10] 5.3.png Steel Pulse - Prodigal Son (David Hinds, Basil Gabbidon, Selwyn Brown, Ronald McQueen, Michael Riley, Steve Nisbett, Alphonso Martin) Reggae
B2 [03:44] 5.9.png Steel Pulse - Ku Klux Klan (David Hinds, Basil Gabbidon, Selwyn Brown, Ronald McQueen, Michael Riley, Steve Nisbett, Alphonso Martin) Reggae
B3 [05:25] 6.9.png Steel Pulse - Prediction (David Hinds, Basil Gabbidon, Selwyn Brown, Ronald McQueen, Michael Riley, Steve Nisbett, Alphonso Martin) Reggae
B4 [04:20] 5.3.png Steel Pulse - Macka Splaff (David Hinds, Basil Gabbidon, Selwyn Brown, Ronald McQueen, Michael Riley, Steve Nisbett, Alphonso Martin) Reggae




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