TJR says

In Britain, in November 1963, The Dave Clark Five released “Glad All Over”, their 6th single, and finally they had thumped their way into the world’s consciousness. By January it was Number One in Britain and Ireland, Top 3 in Australia and Canada. Soon, it’d be Top 10 in the Billboard. The banging “Bits And Pieces” followed in February – it went all the way to Number 2 in the British charts. It was a bit of a sensational turn around for the quintet who’d been slogging away together for several years hitherto. Drummer, leader and founder Dave Clark had been constant since 1957, bass guitarist Rick Huxley had joined in 1958, keyboardist and lead singer Mike Smith joined in 1960, lead guitarist Lenny Davidson joined in 1961 and saxophonist / harmonica player Denis Payton joined in 1962. This intuitive combo would last all the way through to 1970, averaging more than 2 albums per year for their entire career from hereon. The success of those two classic singles induced press hyperbole, stirring up an imaginary Dave Clark Five vs. The Beatles battle with the common gist of the headlines being along the lines of “Tottenham’s thumping response to Merseybeat”. And it rang kinda true to be fair, although I’ve no doubt they were all pals whenever they’d bump into each other. The timing of the hits for the band couldn’t have been better – they were the second group of the “British Invasion” on The Ed Sullivan Show, appearing in March for two weeks after The Beatles had appeared three straight weeks in February 1964. It would signal the start of a mutual love affair between the band and the States, a love affair which would burn intensely for a few years. This debut LP, released in March 1964, set the tone for how things would be from here – released Stateside only. Generally speaking, for the next few years, actual Tottenham residents would have to import the Tottenham sound from America. The cheek of it! The album stands as a semi-compile, rounding up 8 single sides 1963-1964 (many of which were only released in Britain) with 3 brand new tracks – “Time”, “She’s All Mine” and the cover of Maurice Williams “Stay”. There was a great energy to this set – apart from the two rip roaring singles, the likes of “I Know You” and “No Time To Lose” were also highly exciting garage screamers. An early word of caution is noted with the inclusion of the rather trite “Doo Dah”. Who were these really? And could they be trusted?

The Jukebox Rebel
22-Mar-2013

A1 [02:44] 10.0.png The Dave Clark Five - Glad All Over (Dave Clark, Mike Smith) Proto-Punk
A2 [02:17] 6.6.png The Dave Clark Five - All Of The Time (Dave Clark, Mike Smith) Pop
A3 [02:08] 5.6.png The Dave Clark Five - Stay (Maurice Williams) Pop
A4 [02:14] 7.0.png The Dave Clark Five - Chaquita [1963 single version] (Dave Clark, Mike Smith) Blues / Rhythm n Blues
A5 [02:45] 5.7.png The Dave Clark Five - Do You Love Me (Berry Gordy) Pop
B1 [02:00] 9.9.png The Dave Clark Five - Bits And Pieces (Dave Clark, Mike Smith) Proto-Punk
B2 [02:02] 8.0.png The Dave Clark Five - I Know You (Dave Clark, Lenny Davidson) Proto-Punk
B3 [02:02] 6.8.png The Dave Clark Five - No Time To Lose (Dave Clark, Mike Smith) Proto-Punk
B4 [02:24] 3.0.png The Dave Clark Five - Doo Dah (Dave Clark, Ron Ryan) Pop
B5 [02:21] 4.6.png The Dave Clark Five - Time (Dave Clark, Lenny Davidson) Jazz
B6 [02:13] 6.4.png The Dave Clark Five - She’s All Mine (Dave Clark) Blues Rock / Soul Rock




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